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Staff List

Dorothy Abramitis Dorothy Abramitis, Conservator, is principally responsible for the Greek and Roman collection. Her responsibilities include the technical examination and treatment of objects in all media. She was the supervising conservator for the 15-year reinstallation of the Greek and Roman galleries, which was completed in 2007. Dorothy has been involved in significant research on stone sculpture and polychromy in antiquity, and has participated in international organizations and symposia focused on these subjects, including the Copenhagen Polychromy Network and ASMOSIA. She received her Certificate in Conservation with an MA in Art History from New York University and an MFA in Sculpture from Rutgers University.

Selected Publications:

  • Abramitis, Dorothy H. "Statue of an Old Woman: A Case Study in the Effects of Restorations on the Visual Aspect of Sculpture." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 55, no. 3 (Winter 1997–98): 30–37.
  • Abramitis, Dorothy. "Conservation Report, Bacchus Seated on a Panther" in "A Giustiniani Bacchus and François Duquesnoy," by Olga Reggio. Metropolitan Museum Journal 40 (2005): 220–21.
  • Van Keuren, Frances, Julia Cox, Donato Attanasio, Walter Prochaska, John J. Herrmann, Jr., and Dorothy Abramitis. "Parian Lychnites and the Badminton Sarcophagus in New York." In Interdisciplinary Studies on Ancient Stone: Proceedings of the X Association for the Study of Marbles and Other Stones in Antiquity (ASMOSIA) Conference (Rome 2012), edited by Patrizio Pensabene and Eleonora Gasparini, 403–12. Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider, 2015.
Drew Anderson Drew Anderson, Conservator, is responsible for the Museum's stained-glass collection. He received an MA in Stained Glass Conservation from the Victoria and Albert Museum/Royal College of Art and served as senior conservator in the Stained Glass Conservation Section of the Victoria and Albert Museum from 1999 to 2004. Drew previously held a position as production manager at Goddard and Gibbs Stained Glass Studios, Ltd. in London, and has served as a stained-glass committee member of the Council for the Care of Churches and Chairman of the ICON Stained Glass Section in the United Kingdom. He is a member of the Conservation Committee of the American Corpus Vitrearum.

Selected Publications:

  • Anderson, Drew. "L. C. Tiffany's Earliest Surviving Domestic Window." Techniques du vitrail au XIXe siècle, Forum pour la conservation et la restauration des vitraux, Namur 14–16 June 2007, edited by Isabelle Lecocq and Jacques Barlet, 81–89. Les Dossiers de l'IPW 3. Namur: Institut du patrimoine wallon.
  • Anderson, Drew, Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, and Janis Mandrus. "Rediscovering Henry E. Sharp: The Conservation of the Faith and Hope Window at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In The Art of Collaboration: Stained-Glass Conservation in the Twenty-First Century (Corpus Vitrearum USA, Occasional Papers 2), edited by Mary B. Shepard, Lisa Pilosi, and Sebastian Strobl, 83–91. Turnhout: Harvey Miller Publications for the American Corpus Vitrearum, 2010.
  • Pilosi, Lisa, and Drew Anderson. "The Chariot of Poseidon by Jean Dupas and Jacques-Charles Champigneulle at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." Journal of Glass Studies 56 (2014): 219–28.
Mechthild Baumeister Mechthild Baumeister, Conservator, has worked at The Met since 1988. Her primary responsibility is the examination and treatment of furniture, wooden objects, and historic interiors in the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts. In connection with the 2011 reopening of the Museum's New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, Mechthild supervised the study and conservation of all wooden objects, including architectural structures, and has also worked on the Museum's Asian furniture collection. Her education includes an apprenticeship in cabinetmaking and training in furniture and polychrome wood conservation at the Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kultur in Münster, the Klosterkammer Hannover, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Selected Publications:

  • Baumeister, Mechthild. "The Hidden History of a Roentgen Commode." In Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens, 222–28. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012.
  • Baumeister, Mechthild, Beth Edelstein, Adriana Rizzo, Arianna Gambirasi, Timothy Hayes, Roos Keppler, and Julia Schultz. "A Splendid Welcome to the 'House of Praises, Glorious Deeds and Magnanimity.'" In Conservation and the Eastern Mediterranean. International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (IIC), Contributions to the Istanbul Congress, 20–24 September 2010, edited by Christina Rozeik, Ashok Roy, and David Saunders, 126–33. London: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, 2010.
  • Baumeister, Mechthild, Adriana Rizzo, Melanie Brussat, Erika Sanchez Goodwillie, and Batyah Shtrum. "A Re-evaluation of Three Period Rooms in the Wrightsman Galleries at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York." In Architectural Finishes in the Built Environment, edited by Mary A. Jablonski and Catherine R. Matsen, 201–16. London: Archetype, 2009.

Warren Bennett, Associate Object Conservation Preparator, joined the Department of Objects Conservation in 2010. He came to The Met on a contract with the Department of Islamic Art in 2006, during the renovation of the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia. Prior to that, Bennett worked as a model maker and scenic painter for television, animated films, and commercials, and most recently worked at the American Museum of Natural History as an assistant preparator.

Linda Borsch Linda Borsch, Conservator, is responsible for the technical examination and treatment of American sculpture and decorative arts, and European bronzes and decorative arts. Linda holds a master's degree in Art Conservation from Queen's University, Canada, and completed internships at The Met, in the furniture lab of the Canadian Conservation Institute in Ottawa, and in the archaeological and decorative metals lab at the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg. Linda was awarded a two-year fellowship at The Met that focused on medieval art, and worked for 10 years on the reinstallation of the Greek and Roman collection before assuming her current conservation responsibilities in 2001.

Selected Publications:

Nancy Britton Nancy Britton, Conservator, has, since 1991, worked with upholstered works of art across four curatorial departments holding over 500 upholstered objects, including the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts and The American Wing. Responsible for all textiles in a frame, she has conserved hundreds of artworks, caned chairs, fire-screens, and tapestry upholstery, including an English state bed, Marie-Antoinette's Sené suite, and Dutch leather wall hangings. With over 20 publications to her credit, her scholarly interests include historic upholstery materials and upholstery techniques in Europe and America. Nancy works with modern artisans, bringing accurate reproductions of original show covers to the Museum's collection while preserving original elements.

Selected Publications:

  • Britton, Nancy, with Mark Anderson. "The Evolution of American Upholstery Techniques." In The Forgotten History, Upholstery Conservation, edited by Karen Lohm, 30–80. Linköping, Sweden: Linköping University, 2011.
  • Britton, Nancy. "Stitches in Time: The Integration of 18th- and 21st-Century Technologies and Techniques across Three Cultures." In Preprints of the 8th North American Textile Conservation Conference: Plying the Trades: Pulling Together in the 21st Century, Oaxaca, Mexico, November 8–11, 2011. Madison, WI: Omnipress, 2011.
  • ———. "Reconciling Conservation and Interpretation: Strategies for Long-term Display of a Late Seventeenth-Century Bed." In Upholstery Conservation: Principles and Practice, edited by Kathryn Gill and Dinah Eastop, 61–73. Oxford and Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2001.
Matthew Cumbie Matthew Cumbie, Conservation Preparator, joined the Department of Objects Conservation in 2006. The scope of his work varies in size and complexity, and spans across all of the Museum's 17 curatorial departments. He has created hundreds of delicate jewelry mounts, such as those seen in the Jewels by JAR exhibition, to a custom-designed, full-body, articulated mannequin used to display a 19th-century Tibetan skeleton dance costume in The Met collection. Matthew received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, where he studied painting and metalsmithing.
Pete Dandridge Pete Dandridge, Conservator and Administrator, came to the Museum in 1979 after receiving his MA in Conservation and a certificate of advanced studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works of Art. While initially focused on the installation of the Rockefeller Collection of primitive art, he has had, since 1984, primary responsibility for the conservation of the ivories, enamels, and metalwork in the collection of the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters. His published work and lectures have focused principally on elucidating the technical history of these same materials and the capacities of the artists manipulating them.

Selected Publications:

  • Dandridge, Pete, and Mark T. Wypyski. "Sword and Dagger Pommels Associated with the Crusades, Part II: A Technical Study." Metropolitan Museum Journal 46 (2011): 145–152.
  • Dandridge, Pete. "Exquisite Objects, Prodigious Technique: Aquamanilia, Vessels of the Middle Ages." In Lions, Dragons, and Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, Vessels for Church and Table, edited by Peter Barnet and Pete Dandridge, 34–56. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.
  • ———. "A Study of the Gilding of Silver in Byzantium." In Gilded Metals: History, Technology and Conservation, edited by Terry Drayman-Weisser, 123–43. London: Archetype Publications, 2000.
Beth Edelstein Beth Edelstein, Associate Conservator, provides support to the Robert Lehman Collection and the Departments of the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, Greek and Roman Art, Medieval Art, and Asian Art. Major projects at the Museum have included the study and conservation of the Museum's Damascus Room and the reinstallation of the galleries for Oceanic Art. She was also an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at The Met Cloisters from 2003 to 2005. Beth is the co-chair of the K–12 Outreach Working Group of the American Institute for Conservation and has a strong interest in educational outreach in conservation. She received her MA and Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University in 2003.

Selected Publications:

  • Barack, Sarah, and Beth Edelstein. "From One Student to Many: Multi-level Approaches to Conservation Outreach in the K–12 Arena." In Proceedings of Playing to the Galleries and Engaging New Audiences: The Public Face of Conservation, edited by Emily Williams, 96–103. London: Archetype Publications, 2014.
  • Baumeister, Mechthild, Beth Edelstein, Adriana Rizzo, Arianna Gambirasi, Timothy Hayes, Roos Keppler, and Julia Schultz. "A Splendid Welcome to the 'House of Praises, Glorious Deeds and Magnanimity.'" In Conservation and the Eastern Mediterranean. International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (IIC), Contributions to the Istanbul Congress, 20–24 September 2010, edited by Christina Rozeik, Ashok Roy, and David Saunders, 126–33. London: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, 2010.
  • Keppler, Roos, Beth Edelstein, Sarah Barack, and Batyah Shtrum. "The Stars Align: The Preservation of the Zodiac Cycle Murals at the Stanton Street Shul." In ICOM-CC: 16th Triennial Conference, Lisbon, 19–23 September 2011. Almada, Portugal: Critério–Produção Gráfica, Lda., 2011.
Manu Frederickx Manu Frederickx, Associate Conservator, received a master's degree in Musical Instrument Making from the Royal Conservatory in Ghent in 2002. He has worked as an independent maker and restorer of harpsichords and plucked stringed instruments, and trained in the conservation of wood at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. From 2004 to 2015, he was a lecturer at the School of Arts of University College Ghent, where he became head of the Musical Instrument Making Department in 2013. He worked as a conservator at the Musical Instrument Museum, Brussels, from 2009 until joining The Met in 2015.

Jacob Goble, Associate Conservation Preparator, joined The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Objects Conservation staff in 2014 after previously serving as senior departmental technician in the Museum's Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts. Before joining the Museum, Goble worked as a timber framer in Vermont and, more recently, as an adjunct professor of painting in New York. Goble received an MFA in Painting from the Rhode Island School of Design and holds a BFA in Painting and Drawing from the State University of New York at New Paltz.

Daniel Hausdorf After finishing a three-year cabinet-making apprenticeship in 1999, Daniel Hausdorf, Associate Conservator, continued to work as a furniture maker before transitioning to furniture conservation in 2001. During his studies in conservation at the University of Applied Science in Potsdam (Germany), he completed internships at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. In 2007 he joined the Department of Objects Conservation at The Met, where his responsibilities include technical examination, research, treatment, and installation of historic interiors, furniture, and wooden objects in the departmental collections of Modern and Contemporary Art, the Robert Lehman Collection, Asian Art, and Islamic Art. In 2014, Daniel was elected coordinator of the ICOM-CC Working Group Wood, Furniture, and Lacquer.

Selected Publications:

  • Carboni, Stefano, and Daniel Hausdorf. "Panel (Lid from a Chest)." In Masterpieces from the Department of Islamic Art in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, edited by Maryam D. Ekhtiar, Priscilla P. Soucek, Sheila R. Canby, and Navina N. Haidar, 43–44. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2011.
  • Meincke, Angela, Daniel Hausdorf, Nonie Gadsden, Mechthild Baumeister, Michele Derrick, Richard Newman, and Adriana Rizzo. "Early Cellulose Nitrate Coatings on Furniture of the Company of Master Craftsmen." Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 48, no. 1 (2009): 1–24.
Ann Heywood Ann Heywood, Conservator, is principally responsible for the Egyptian collection. In that role, she works closely with the curators in the Department of Egyptian Art on all new acquisitions and gifts, outgoing and incoming loans, gallery conditions, special exhibitions, permanent gallery installations, and material and technology research. Her own research has focused on the pigments of ancient Egypt. Ann is the supervising conservator for The Met's expeditions to Lisht and Dahshur. She joined the Department of Objects Conservation in 1988 after graduate work in Art History and Conservation at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

Selected Publications:

  • Heywood, Ann. "Lead Cladding on a Wooden Royal Figure: An Unusual Ancient Surface Reconstructed." In Decorated Surfaces on Ancient Egyptian Objects: Technology, Deterioration and Conservation, edited by C. Rozeik, J. Dawson, and M. Wright, 9–15. Cambridge: Fitzwilliam Museum: University of Cambridge, 2010.
  • ———. "Evidence for the Use of Azurite and Natural Ultramarine Pigments in Ancient Egypt." Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science, and Technology 1 (2010): 73–81.
  • ———. "The Use of Huntite as a White Pigment in Ancient Egypt." In Colour and Painting in Ancient Egypt, edited by W. V. Davies, 5–9. London: British Museum Press, 2001.
Ellen Howe Ellen Howe, Conservator, is responsible for the care and study of objects in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Her work includes conservation of a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, with a specialty in the technology of archaeological and ethnographic objects from the Americas and West/Central Africa. Ellen joined the Department of Objects Conservation in 1981, having received an MA and Certificate of Advanced Study in Art Conservation from the State University of New York, Cooperstown Graduate Program, and a BA in Studio Art/Art History from Smith College.

Selected Publications:

  • Howe, Ellen G. "Fon Silver Jewelry of the Twentieth Century." Met Objectives 1, no. 2 (Spring 2000): 4–5, 8.
  • Howe, Ellen G., and Ulrich Petersen. "Silver and Lead in the Late Prehistory of the Mantaro Valley, Peru." In Archaeometry of Pre-Columbian Sites and Artifacts: Proceedings of a Symposium Organized by the UCLA Institute of Archaeology and the Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles, California, March 23–27, 1992, edited by David A. Scott and Pieter Meyers, 18398. Marina Del Rey: Getty Conservation Institute, 1994.
Keelia Jacobs Keelia Jacobs, Assistant for Administration, assists Lisa Pilosi, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge, and manages the administration of the Indian Conservation Fellowship Pilot Program. This program, supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Ministry of Culture, Government of India, aims to broaden the experience of Indian conservators through fellowships and seminars. Keelia graduated with honors from Davidson College with a bachelor's degree in Art History. Prior to her employment at The Met, she worked in client-facing roles at several galleries and an auction house.
Lucretia Kargere Lucretia Kargère, Conservator, has been the principal conservator for The Met Cloisters since 2000. She came to The Met in 1994, when she was awarded the first of several fellowships for the technical study and treatment of medieval sculpture. She is a graduate of Brown University and the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, where she received an MA in Art History and an Advanced Certificate in Conservation, after completing internships at the Institut Royal du Patrimoine Artistique (IRPA) in Brussels, and the Palazzo Pitti in Florence. Specializing in the treatment of polychrome wood sculpture, Lucretia has notably published a significant study of French Romanesque sculpture from The Met collection.

Selected Publications:

  • Kargère, Lucretia, and Michele Marincola. "Conservation in Context: The Examination and Treatment of Medieval Polychrome Wood Sculpture in America." Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science and Technology 2 (2014): 11–49.
  • Kargère, Lucretia, Pierre-Yves Le Pogam, Juliette Lévy-Hinstin, and Nathalie Pingaud. "Un Christ roman auvergnat retrouve son unité grâce à l'étude de la polychromie." Technè 39 (2014): 60–65.
  • Kargère, Lucretia, and Adriana Rizzo. "Twelfth-Century French Polychrome Sculpture in The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Materials and Techniques." Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science, and Technology 1 (2010): 39–72.
Jean-François de Lapérouse Jean-François de Lapérouse, Conservator, works primarily with the Ancient Near Eastern and Islamic Art collections, and is especially interested in examining the complex interplay of early technologies with artistic production and aesthetics. He majored in Art History at Princeton University and completed all of the coursework for a doctorate in Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, where he also received a Certificate in Conservation.

Selected Publications:

  • Lapérouse, Jean-François de. "Early Mesopotamian Metallurgy." In Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures, edited by Helaine Selin, 1624–34. 2nd ed. Berlin: Springer, 2008.
  • Lapérouse, Jean-François de, Stefan Heidemann, and Vicki Parry. "The Large Audience: Life-Sized Stucco Figures of Royal Princes from the Seljuk Period." Muqarnas 31 (2014): 35–71.
  • MetPublications: Selected essays and catalogue entries by Jean-François de Lapérouse
Ashira Loike Ashira Loike, Assistant Administrator, is responsible for administration and for overseeing photography and documentation standards in the Department of Objects Conservation. Ashira specializes in imaging techniques, such as Reflectance Transformation Imaging, which allow conservators to record information about the three-dimensional surfaces of artwork. She has collaborated with colleagues at the Smithsonian Museums, University of Southampton, Oxford University, and others on implementation and development of these capture methods. Ashira addresses broader issues of conservation documentation through involvement in the Andrew W. Mellon–funded ConservationSpace project. She joined the department in 2007, after receiving a BA from Barnard College. Ashira earned an MA in Medieval Art History from Hunter College in 2012.
Janis Mandrus Janis Mandrus, Associate Conservator, joined the Department of Objects Conservation in 2006. She has worked on a broad range of projects at The Met, including the treatment of archaeological ceramics and glass, as well as European and American ceramics, glass, stained glass, and decorative metalwork. Janis holds a BA in Classical Studies from Hunter College, an MA in Art History from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, and a Master of Art Conservation from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario.

Selected Publications:

  • Abend, Karen, Linda Borsch, Julia Day, Janis Mandrus, and Lisa Pilosi. "Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Lighting Fixtures in The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In The Artifact, Its Context and Their Narrative: Multidisciplinary Conservation in Historic House Museums, the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, November 6–9, 2012; Proceedings of the Joint Conference of ICOM-DEMHIST and Three ICOM-CC Working Groups (Sculpture, Polychromy, and Architectural Decoration; Wood, Furniture, and Lacquer; Textiles), edited by Kate Seymour and Malgorzata Sawicki. ICOM-CC & ICOM-DEMHIST, 2012.
  • Anderson, Drew, Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, and Janis Mandrus. "Rediscovering Henry E. Sharp: The Conservation of the Faith and Hope Window at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In The Art of Collaboration: Stained-Glass Conservation in the Twenty-first Century (Corpus Vitrearum USA, Occasional Papers 2), edited by Mary B. Shepard, Lisa Pilosi, and Sebastian Strobl, 83–91. Turnhout: Harvey Miller Publications for the American Corpus Vitrearum, 2010.
Marijn Manuels Marijn Manuels, Conservator, received his training in Amsterdam and joined the Department of Objects Conservation in 1996. For many years he has been responsible for the care, examination, and treatment of The American Wing's collection of interiors, furniture, and wooden objects. Past projects include exhibitions such as Honoré Lannuier (1998), Art and the Empire City (2000), John Townsend (2005), and Duncan Phyfe (2011), as well as the 10-year reinstallation of The American Wing's galleries and period rooms, which was completed in 2011. More recently he worked on the installation of the Worsham-Rockefeller dressing room and an accompanying exhibition about its maker, George A. Schastey.

Shoji Miyazawa, Associate Conservation Preparator, joined The Met's Department of Objects Conservation in 2013, soon after graduating from the State University of New York at New Paltz with an MFA in Metal. In 2011 he received his BFA with an emphasis in Metalsmithing from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. Notable exhibitions on which he has worked include Assyria to Iberia at the Dawn of the Classical Age (2014), Ancient Egyptian Queens and Goddesses: Treasures from The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2014), Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century (2014), and Jewels by JAR (2014).

Vicki Parry Vicki Parry, Conservator, began work at The Met in 2002, and has since worked on two of the largest gallery reinstallation projects: the Greek and Roman galleries, and the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia. Now responsible for the conservation of all ceramics in the Department of Asian Art, she also conserves other decorative arts in their collection made from a variety of materials such as jade, cloisonné enamel, amber, bamboo, rattan, and lacquer. Although her primary focus is Asian art, Vicki continues to study and conserve Islamic ceramics and is involved in an international multi-institutional study of Islamic figural stucco carving.

Selected Publications:

  • Lapérouse, Jean-François de, Karen Stamm, and Vicki Parry. "Re-examination and Treatment of Mina'i Ceramics at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In Glass and Ceramics Conservation 2007: Preprints of the Interim Meeting of the ICOM-CC Working Group, August 27–30, 2007, Nova Gorica, Slovenia, edited by Lisa Pilosi, 112–19. Nova Gorica, Slovenia: Goriški Muzej Nova Gorica, 2007.
  • Lapérouse, Jean-François de, Stefan Heidemann, and Vicki Parry. "The Large Audience: Life-Sized Stucco Figures of Royal Princes from the Seljuq Period." Muqarnas 31 (2014): 35–71.
  • Parry, Vicki. "Nishapur Ceramics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art: 70 Years of Restoration Techniques" In Greater Khorasan History, Geography, Archaeology and Material Culture, edited by Rocco Rante, 151‒60. Studies in the History and Culture of the Middle East 29. Boston: de Gruyter, 2015.
Pascale Patris Pascale Patris, Conservator, joined Objects Conservation at The Met in 1994. Her main responsibilities include the research and treatment of painted and gilded wood surfaces of decorative arts from medieval Europe, through the Italian Renaissance and Baroque periods, and to the 19th-century Gilded Age in America. Pascale received her training in conservation in Paris, where she focused primarily on European sculpture. Prior to training in conservation, she studied fine arts. Since joining the Museum, Pascale expanded her expertise in the study and analytical interpretation of surface finishes for European and American decorative arts and sculpture, with a personal interest in the study of the surface finishes of Asian sculpture.

Selected Publications:

  • Patris, Pascale, and Adriana Rizzo. "An Unfolding Tale: The Making and Transforming of the Golden Harpsichord." Journal of the American Musical Instrument Society 39 (2013): 62–88.
  • Patris, Pascale. "A Few Remarks Resulting from the Examination of the Bernstorff Suite." ICOM-CC: Wood, Furniture, and Lacquer Newsletter 2 (January 2011): 10–14.
  • ———. "Preserving a Herter Brothers Side Chair." Met Objectives 4, no. 2 (Spring 2003): 8–10.
Lisa Pilosi Lisa Pilosi, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge, is responsible for the academic and administrative supervision of the Department of Objects Conservation and is the department's primary liaison with other Museum operations. Prior to assuming this role in July 2014, Lisa was principal conservator for three-dimensional glass objects in the Museum's collection for 26 years. She served as chair of the Committee for Conservation of ICOM from 2011 to 2014 and currently serves on ICOM's Disaster Relief Task Force. Lisa earned a bachelor's degree in Art History and Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania and a master's degree and Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

Selected Publications:

  • Pilosi, Lisa, and Drew Anderson. "The Chariot of Poseidon by Jean Dupas and Jacques-Charles Champigneulle at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." Journal of Glass Studies 56 (2014): 219–28.
  • Pilosi, Lisa, and David Whitehouse. "Early Islamic and Byzantine Silver Stain." In New Light on Old Glass: Recent Research on Byzantine Mosaics and Glass (British Museum Research Publication 179), edited by Chris Entwistle and Liz James, 329–37. London: British Museum, 2013.
  • Pilosi, Lisa, Sarah Barack, and Mark T. Wypyski. "Early Acid Etching of Stained Glass." In Le vitrail et les traités du Moyen Âge à nos jours, Actes du XXIIIe colloque international du Corpus Vitrearum, Tours, 3–7 juillet 2006, edited by Karine Boulanger and Michel Hérold, 97–110. Berne and New York: Peter Lang, 2008.
Carolyn Riccardelli Carolyn Riccardelli, Conservator, joined the Museum in 2002 and specializes in structural issues related to large-scale sculpture. From 2005 to 2014, her primary project was Tullio Lombardo's Adam, in which she was the principal member of a team of conservators and scientists conducting research on adhesives and pinning materials, as well as developing innovative methods for reassembling the damaged sculpture. Carolyn is one of the primary coordinators of graduate interns in the Department of Objects Conservation and is an active member of the Museum's Collection Emergency Team. Carolyn holds a BA in Anthropology from Newcomb College, Tulane University, and an MA from the Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State College.

Selected Publications:

  • Riccardelli, Carolyn, Jack Soultanian, Michael Morris, Lawrence Becker, George Wheeler, and Ron Street. "The Treatment of Tullio Lombardo's Adam: A New Approach to the Conservation of Monumental Marble Sculpture." Metropolitan Museum Journal 49 (2014): 49–116.
  • Riccardelli, Carolyn, George E. Wheeler, Christina Muir, George Scherer, and Joe Vocaturo. "An Examination of Pinning Materials for Marble Sculpture." In Objects Specialty Group Postprints: American Institute for Conservation 38th Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, WI, edited by Christine del Re, 95–112. Washington, D.C.: American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works, 2012.
  • Academia.edu: Publications by Carolyn Riccardelli
Kendra Roth Kendra Roth, Conservator, is responsible for sculpture and decorative arts in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art's collection—a role she has held since 2007, after spending 10 years participating in the reinstallation of the Greek and Roman galleries. She serves on the program committee for Voices in Contemporary Art and the Conservation Advisory Group for the Public Design Commission of the City of New York. Kendra joined the Museum in 1997, after completing graduate work in Art Conservation at the State University of New York at Buffalo and the Straus Center for Conservation at Harvard University.

Selected Publications:

Frederick Sager Frederick Sager, Supervising Conservation Preparator, began work at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980 preparing architectural elements for period-room installations in The American Wing. Following this he restored two stone chimneypieces in the French galleries. From 1990 to 1995, he was a wood restorer in the five-year conservation treatment and installation of the Gubbio studiolo. Since 1996, he has been a conservation preparator and is currently the supervising conservation preparator in the department, where his responsibilities include mount making, art installation, and the supervision of a four-person team.
David Sastre After graduating from the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana with a degree in Biology, David Sastre, Assistant Manager for Laboratories and Studio, worked for a number of institutions—including the Instituto Nacional de Salud in Bogotá, the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, where he focused on scientific research. Since 2011, David has managed the laboratories of the Department of Objects Conservation at The Met. As lab manager, David oversees operations and safety, equipment acquisition and maintenance, permit renewal, and chemical management. David is also conducting research about the reconditioning of silica gel to help provide the optimal environmental conditions for objects in the Museum.
Deborah Schorsch Deborah Schorsch, Conservator, focuses her technical research on ancient metalwork, with special attention to Egypt. In close collaboration with curators in the Museum's Department of Egyptian Art, she has studied statuary, jewelry, and ritual and utilitarian implements of gold, silver, and bronze to document manufacturing processes and materials, endeavoring to define ancient Egyptian technological style. Deborah lectures on ancient metalworking practices and on the radiography of works of art at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, where she received graduate training in Art History and Conservation. As an excavator, field conservator, or consultant, she has participated in excavations in Egypt, France, Switzerland, Peru, and Manhattan.

Selected Publications:

  • Schorsch, Deborah. "A Conservator's Perspective on Ancient Metallurgy." In Archaeometallurgy in Global Perspective, edited by Benjamin W. Roberts and Christopher Thornton, 268–302. New York: Springer, 2014.
  • Schorsch, Deborah, and Mark T. Wypyski. "Seth, 'Figure of Mystery.'" Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 45 (2009): 1–24.
  • MetPublications: Selected publications by Deborah Schorsch
Jack Soultanian Jack Soultanian, Conservator, specializes in the examination and treatment of European sculpture from the early Middle Ages to 1900. Prior to his arrival at The Met in 1986, he was the chief conservator at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston for nine years. He holds an MA in Art History and a Certificate in Conservation from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, where he currently serves as adjunct faculty. Additionally, Jack is a consultant conservator at Villa La Pietra, Sir Harold Acton's Florence residence bequeathed to New York University.

Selected Publications:

  • Bloom, Jonathan M., Ahmed Toufiq, Stefano Carboni, Jack Soultanian, Antoine M. Wilmering, Mark D. Minor, Andrew Zawacki, and El Mostafa Hbibi. The Minbar from the Kutubiyya Mosque. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1998.
  • Riccardelli, Carolyn, Jack Soultanian, Michael Morris, Lawrence Becker, George Wheeler, and Ronald Street. "The Treatment of Tullio Lombardo's Adam: A New Approach to the Conservation of Monumental Marble Sculpture." Metropolitan Museum Journal 49 (2014): 49–116.
  • MetPublications: Selected publications by Jack Soultanian
Karen Stamm Karen Stamm, Conservator, is responsible for the technical examination and treatment of three-dimensional glass objects in the Museum's collection. She received her training in Archaeological Conservation at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and holds an undergraduate degree in Anthropology and Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania. Karen worked as a conservator at the Athenian Agora for three years, as well as on other Mediterranean sites. She joined The Met in 1998 and has worked on the reinstallation of the Greek and Roman galleries and the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, as well as the conservation of sculpture in the Department of Asian Art's collection, before assuming her current responsibilities for glass.

Selected Publications:

  • Lapérouse, Jean-François de, Karen Stamm, and Vicki Parry. "Re-examination and Treatment of Mina'i Ceramics at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In Glass and Ceramics Conservation 2007: Preprints of the Interim Meeting of the ICOM-CC Working Group, August 27–30, 2007, Nova Gorica, Slovenia, edited by Lisa Pilosi, 112–19. Nova Gorica: Goriški Muzej Kromberk, 2007.
  • Pilosi, Lisa, Karen Stamm, and Mark T. Wypyski. "An Islamic Cameo Glass Fragment in The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In Annales du 18e Congrès de l'Association Internationale pour l'Histoire du Verre, Thessaloniki, 2009, edited by Despina Ignatiadou and Anastassios Antonaras, 341–45. Thessaloniki: ZITI Publishing, 2012.
  • Stamm, Karen, Gorazd Lemajič, and Lisa Pilosi. "Vacuum-Formed PVC Molds for Casting Resin Fills in Glass Objects." In Recent Advances in Glass, Stained Glass, and Ceramics Conservation 2013, ICOM-CC Glass and Ceramics Working Group Interim Meeting and Forum of the International Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Stained Glass (Corpus Vitrearum-ICOMOS), edited by Hannelore Roemich and Kate van Lookeren Campagne, 69–75. Zwolle: SPA Uitgevers, 2013.
Wendy Walker Wendy Walker, Conservator, is experienced with metals, glass, and stone, specializes in the conservation of ceramics, and has a special interest in the technology of pottery. After conservation training at West Dean College in England, she worked at the British Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum and as site conservator on several excavations in the Mediterranean and Middle East. Wendy came to The Met in 1999 and is responsible for conservation of a wide range of ceramics, including Greek terracottas, Italian Renaissance majolica, English and German porcelain, and early American pottery for exhibitions, loans, and research.